Albert Von Tilzer

We have begun to amass a significant collection of Albert Von Tilzer songs. He composed the music to “Take Me Out To the Ball Game” in 1908. He, like his brother Harry Von Tilzer, made many wonderful hits. The whole family adopted the name Von Tilzer in order to sound more German. Here’s our playlist:

Sheet Music News

Quote from Brown: “The Brown University Library has a project underway (December 2020) to separate materials created by Black artists from the blackface minstrelsy and more accurately describe each item.”


Janice Cleary of Omaha, Nebraska collected 50,000 songs. Her son has donated this large collection to Mississippi State University. Mrs. Cleary passed away in 2021 at the age of 96. See this article:

https://syncopatedtimes.com/janice-cleary-sheet-music-collector-dies-at-96/


Aunt Jemima is being removed from pancake boxes and syrup bottles. This has caused a great many people to look up our recordings of Old Aunt Jemima and Aunt Jemima’s Lullaby. The later actually mentions pancakes as a reward for the sleeping child.

Old Aunt Jemima

Aunt Jemima’s Lullaby


One of our midi collaborators is Jonathan Parks of Minneapolis. He has a MuseScore website called crono23. You can find the songs by filtering for voice as the instrument.

https://musescore.com/crono23


Did you know that music was being printed and sold in the United States during George Washington’s time? There were even musical plays then. Your best bet for finding these earlier songs online would be The Library of Congress website and The Lester Levy collection at John Hopkins University.


We would love to be sponsored. Our goal of making demos for all published sheet music songs is currently being accomplished by wonderful and very dedicated volunteers. The effort could certainly be sped up by sponsors. For one thing money could buy us marketing expertise to expand our visibility and reach.


The complete songs of Stephen Foster in midi are available here:

http://www.stephen-foster-songs.de/

There you will find midi and mp3 for each song. Also at that site are all the songs from the book Popular Songs of Nineteenth-century America.


You can join us as a sheet music singer. Just set a goal to learn how to do it. You will need a gadget to record with. It’s very rewarding and enjoyable. Many “experts” say that singing is good for the mind. We give you resources on this and our other sites. There are plenty of songs to go around.

Step 1 – Look at Sheet Music

We give you pdfs for hundreds of sheet music songs on this website. Follow these steps to see them:

  1. Look down through the song list for a title that looks interesting.
  2. Click on the title to open the song’s info page.
  3. Click on the words SHEET MUSIC in all caps to open the song’s pdf.
  4. OR click on the link given which will take you to a website where you can click “View sheet music” or “Download”. It won’t actually download, it will load into your screen memory.
  5. Scroll down to see all the pages of the pdf.